Carbon 14 dating half

When a creature dies, it ceases to consume more radiocarbon while the C-14 already in its body continues to decay back into nitrogen.

The half-life of Carbon $, that is, the time required for half of the Carbon $ in a sample to decay, is variable: not every Carbon $ specimen has exactly the same half life.

The new isotope is called "radiocarbon" because it is radioactive, though it is not dangerous.

It is naturally unstable and so it will spontaneously decay back into N-14 after a period of time.

Meet paleoclimatologist Scott Stine, who uses radiocarbon dating to study changes in climate. What we think of as normal carbon is called carbon-12: six protons plus six neutrons. Several times a year, scientist Scott Stine travels to the shores of Mono Lake, near Yosemite National Park. He's studying the long history of droughts in California, trying to determine how frequently they occur and how long they last.Since then, the remains of those trees have been well preserved by the arid climate. To determine how long ago these droughts occurred, Scott is using carbon-14 to date the trees.Unlike the other natural isotopes of carbon, carbon-14 is unstable. One of its neutrons turns into a proton and spits out an electron.This rather complex formula shows you how to solve this puzzle using accepted scientific methods.Evolutionists have long used the carbon-14, or radiocarbon, dating technique as a “hammer” to bludgeon Bible-believing Christians.